THE EDGY SHOES OF CHRISTIAN LOUBOUTIN—DESIGNING FOR BALANCE

You may think designing shoes would be a fairly straightforward craft. But one designer in that field has chosen to make it a mystery. And we can thank our lucky stars he has!

Before going into the deadly factors of his craft, let’s not forget that we’re in for a test of sheer equilibrium, which comes down to a test of love toward pristine dynamics.

                     Not Botticelli, but Venus, negotiating a tricky gravitational energy.

Louboutin takes his cues from showgirls, and their stunning skill in negotiating descents in very, very high heels.

He claims to be unimpressed with the minimalist thrust of contemporary arts; but there is about the lightning bolts he trades in a paring down to uncanny essences.

                A lightness here, seriously departing (and yet not forsaking) terra firma.

            The designer’s formats, not so coincidentally arrayed as a rock climbing wall.

                                                            Aphrodite descending.

                                                                     A long way down.

                                                                A long, long way down…

                     Poise and its verve—serenity shot through with deadly abysses.

There is a territory, stemming from Louboutin’s collaboration (in 2007) with filmmaker, David Lynch (clearly a kindred spirit, when you think of the showgirls in the latter’s Blue Velvet, Lost Highway and Mulholland Drive), focusing upon shoe fetishes. This hot little number will appear, later, on our film blog, Rather Have the Blues.

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