THE MUSIC OF GRAPHIC ART

Last week we attended a musical event that ruffled a lot of feathers. It will be covered in some detail on Friday’s blog; but, for now, suffice it to say that the percussive aspect was more than most members of the audience could handle.
That show had percussion tearing into the territory of rock. Here we have an edgy little initiative about a gypsy girl who catches the eye of Napoleon. 
More drumming, now in the mode of suave jazz (the heavy text component alluding, in a way, to the complexities of that genre).
French musical Surrealism, as hauntingly scored by Michel Legrand. (Another subject liable to frighten the faint of heart.)

I dare anyone to walk out of a show like like this, its charms so gloriously conveyed by that quite sublime designer, Gino Boccasile.
   The good old days, captured by that much more than good posterist, Geo Ham.
Perhaps not everyone’s cup of tea. But this razzmatazz does project a kind of fascination similar to a train going off the rails.
                                                      A blues king is a real king!
The searchlights shimmering off of that ring provide an evocative tribute, as does the artwork on that face.
Nothing but pure musicality. Looks so safe. Sounds so strangely dangerous, as designer Andre Marty so brilliantly manages to convey.

                                   Don’t tell me you’ve never heard of the jazzoflute!

Boccasile again, so attuned to the fire that goes into music and great, empathetic graphics!

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This entry was posted in Art Deco Posters&Graphics, Illustration Art, Performance Art, Poster&Graphic Art, Poster&Graphic Artists, Surrealist Posters&Graphics and tagged , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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