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GIUSEPPE RICCOBALDI (1887-1976)

Riccobaldi was virtually unique among graphic designers of his time, in having admired and studied at some length the Angst-ridden and hyper-dramatic late nineteenth century, early twentieth century art of such figures as Aubrey Beardsley, Gustav Klimt, Egon Schiele and Edvard Munch. Theatricality and darkness would, thereby, become the watchwords of a promotional production that proved surprisingly effective amongst a mass market not particularly interested in stress, but having quite an appetite for juicy suspense.

There were two major outlets for the motives, of daunting mystery and power, that Riccobaldi was born to develop. One was travel promotions, particularly regarding ancient Egypt and ancient Rome. The great Egyptian monuments served as terrific stage sets within enticements to breathe in the grand and violent presence of that place. In the poster shown below, a woman carrying water, by the Nile, produces a reflection of the Lloyd Triestino cruise ship, drawn to her as if she were a monumental magnet.

In the second poster , shown above, the lady tourist is right on top of the monuments pulling the ship forward. In the graphic for many oriental destinations, the exotic little craft pulls the beautiful, streamlined modern liner toward it and its home port.

The harem figure on the cover of a publication about faraway places exerts an attraction directly upon the viewer.

A final example of Riccobaldi’s great skill as to travel promotions is the poster for Castellammare, where Mount Vesuvius and ancient spas are allowed to exert their irresistible charms.

A second area, benefiting from his breathtaking skills consisted of pulsating vehicles for transporting one in a practical sense, but, more importantly, in a poetic sense. Coming from the land and era of Futurist design, Riccobaldi shows an arresting talent for presenting compelling examples of speedy and intrepid means of transportation.

Please enjoy more Riccobaldi graphics at the following link: http://www.idesirevintageposters.com/riccobaldi.html